Dirty Limericks: Meaning, Origin, Examples & How To Write?

Freddy Green

dirty limericks

What are dirty limericks and from where did they come from.? Who was the first one to write them? Here in the below article, I will first tell you the meaning of the origin with some examples. Then you can also know how to write these by yourself. Let us not waste time and start knowing about the same.

What Is Dirty Limericks

Dirty Limericks are short 5 line poems having rhythm and rhyming patterns which commonly are on taboo subjects but in a playful and cheeky or rude way. Many times these Limericks push the social acceptation boundaries too far. Despite much criticism, many people enjoy reading them. If you are planning to read some of them then remember that it is not for all audiences and the approach should be with caution.

Also Read : SMUT Meaning In Books And Full Form Of SMUT?

Origin Of Limericks

Origin Of Limericks

The origin of Limericks is long back in the 18th century in an Irish town known as Limerick. They first became famous and popular in pubs and gatherings as a way of entertainment. You can get some traces of the limericks in many traditional folk songs and ballads of Irish Culture. Originally the limericks were created with special care of soft tone, that featured a humorous character with unexpected twists. As the limericks spread around the world the tone and nature changed with time. Like some created the Dirty Limericks.

Examples Of Dirty Limericks

Examples Of Dirty Limericks

Here are some examples of Dirty Limericks, have a look at them.

  • There once was a woman named Jill 

Who swallowed an exploding pill 

They found her vagina In North Carolina  

And her tits in a tree in Brazil!

  • The lass I brought home was a prize,

With an alluring set of bright blue eyes,

Her breasts, so well kept,

Were what I’d expect,

But her penis was quite a surprise.

  • A lady once triplets begat,

Named Nat and Pat and Tat,

Though it was fun breeding,

The trouble was feeding,

Cause there just was no tit for Ta

  • If vodka were water and I were a duck,

I’d swim to the bottom and never come up.

But water’s not vodka and I’m not a duck,

So pass me a bottle and shut the f**k up.

  • Said a woman with open delight,

My pubic hair’s perfectly white.

I admit there’s a glare,

But the fellows don’t care

They locate it more quickly at night.

How To Write Dirty Limericks

How To Write Dirty Limericks

Writing a Dirty Limerick is easy as you just need to understand the structure of the poem. Here I will explain to you how to do that.

  1. In the first line of the poem, you need to introduce the subject and the sense.
  2. Now the second should be such that it should rhyme with the fifth with 3 stressed syllables.
  3. Same as the above the third should rhyme with 4th lines but with 2 syllables.
  4. The fourth line should rhyme with 3rd. 
  5. The fifth line should match with the second.
  6. The last line should have an unexpected twist with humor.

Conclusion

As explained above the dirty limericks are some jokes that are short and rhythmic poems. Even though the limericks were originally just simple plain jokes with time some people came up with dirty limericks. Just as a caution everyone does not appreciate dirty limericks and considers it as offensive. So proceed with caution.

FAQ

What Is The Meaning Of A Limerick?

Limericks are short poematic jokes of 5 lines that have rhyming words in them.

What Is An Example Of A Limerick?

There once was a man from Nantucket 

Who kept all his cash in a bucket. 

But his daughter, named Nan, 

Ran away with a man 

And as for the bucket, Nantucket.

What Is The Most Famous Limerick?

One of the most famous limericks from the book “A Book Of Nonsense” is 

There was an Old Man with a beard, 

Who said, ‘It is just as I feared! 

Two Owls and a Hen, 

Four Larks and a Wren, 

Have all built their nests in my beard!

What Is The Oldest Known Limerick?

The oldest known Limerick is the one that is included in the song “Sumer Is Icumen In’”

Sources:

https://poemsplease.com/dirty-limerick-poems/

https://www.britannica.com/art/macaronic

http://www.funlimericks.com/dirty-limericks.php?page=2